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Fish and Seafood - Canada - November 2017

"The overwhelming majority of Canadians eat fish and/or seafood. Yet while the industry enjoys usage from nine in 10 (87%) Canadians who eat fish and 72% seafood, it is also experiencing a transition. Per capita consumption is softening over the longer term as Canada’s population evolves. This Report examines what Canadians claim to eat, and also the reasons why they eat fish and/or seafood and why those who don’t, don’t. It also identifies what formats are most popular and with whom, and examines attributes that are most likely to influence purchase with the aim of providing evidence-based perspectives that can inform potential strategic positioning."

- Joel Gregoire, Senior Food & Drink Analyst

This report will look at the following areas:

  • Canadians are eating less ‘processed fish’ per capita
  • Frozen fish leading declines in per capita consumption

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Table of contents

  1. Overview

    • What you need to know
      • Definition
      • Executive Summary

        • The issues
          • Canadians are eating less ‘processed fish’ per capita
            • Figure 1: Retail per capita volume consumption of processed fish, 2008-16
          • Frozen fish leading declines in per capita consumption
            • Figure 2: Share of retail volume sales, by market segment, 2012-16
          • The opportunities
            • Aging population should heighten demand for fish
              • Figure 3: “Meat substitute” as a reason for eating fish/seafood, by age, September 2017
            • Seafood is more popular among Chinese Canadians
              • Figure 4: Seafood usage: Chinese Canadians vs overall population, September 2017
            • Fish/seafood fits with a healthy lifestyle
              • Figure 5: Reasons for eating fish and/or seafood, September 2017
            • Opportunity to meet demand for convenience
              • Figure 6: Attributes considered when purchasing fish and/or seafood, September 2017
              • Figure 7: Can't Mess It Up! Honey Balsamic Wild Pink Salmon (Canada), July 2017
            • What it means
            • The Market – What You Need to Know

              • Volume declines apparent while dollar sales point upward
                • Frozen losing share to chilled (fresh)
                  • Canada’s aging population represents an opportunity for fish
                  • Market Size and Forecast

                    • Volume declines apparent while dollar sales point upward
                      • Figure 8: Retail processed fish Canadian value sales and forecast, at current prices, 2011-22
                      • Figure 9: Retail processed fish Canadian value sales and forecast, at current prices, 2011-22
                      • Figure 10: Share value sales of retail market, by company, 2015 and 2016
                      • Figure 11: Share value vs volume sales of retail market, by company, 2016
                  • Market Breakdown

                    • Frozen losing share to chilled (fresh)
                      • Figure 12: Share of retail volume sales, by market segment, 2012-16
                  • Market Factors

                    • Immigration fuelling Canada’s population growth
                      • Figure 13: Foreign-born share of population, by G8 country and Australia
                    • Focus on health and weight management to continue
                      • Figure 14: Body mass index, self-reported rate of being overweight or obese among Canadian adults, by gender, 2010-14
                    • Canada’s aging population represents an opportunity for fish
                      • Figure 15: Population aged 65 years and over in Canada, historical and projected (% of total), 1971-2061
                  • Key Players – What You Need to Know

                    • Ethically focused claims are more prominent
                      • Growing reliance on fish/seafood impacts oceanic health
                        • Advancements in traceability innovation
                        • What’s Working?

                          • Ethically focused claims are more prominent
                            • Figure 16: Growth of claims on fish product launches (North America), 2016 vs 2014
                            • Figure 17: Clover Leaf Solid White Albacore Tuna in Water (Canada), February 2017
                            • Figure 18: High Liner Signature English Style Battered Haddock Fillets (Canada), December 2016
                        • Challenges

                          • Growing reliance on fish/seafood impacts oceanic health
                            • Figure 19: World fisheries and aquaculture production and utilization, 2009-14
                            • Figure 20: UNESCO proposes a Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development, April 2017
                          • Frozen fish/seafood losing share
                          • What’s Next?

                            • More fish products tout convenience
                              • Figure 21: Bumble Bee Seafood (US), October 2017
                              • Figure 22: Sushi at Home Ikijime Shrimp (US), September 2017
                              • Figure 23: StarKist Selects E.V.O.O. Wild Caught Yellowfin Tuna in Extra Virgin Olive Oil with Sundried Tomato (US), August 2017
                            • Advancements in traceability innovation
                            • The Consumer – What You Need to Know

                              • Nearly nine in 10 Canadians eat fish
                                • Three quarters of Canadians eat seafood
                                  • Taste is the top reason for eating fish and/or seafood
                                    • Price is the most important factor for consumers
                                      • Where fish is sourced and what’s in it matter
                                        • Chinese Canadians eat more seafood
                                        • Fish and Seafood Consumption

                                          • Nearly nine in 10 Canadians eat fish
                                            • Figure 24: Top fish types eaten, September 2017
                                            • Figure 25: Fish consumption, by age, September 2017
                                            • Figure 26: Fish consumption, by region, September 2017
                                          • Three quarters of Canadians eat seafood
                                            • Figure 27: Top fish seafood eaten, September 2017
                                            • Figure 28: Seafood usage, by household income, September 2017
                                            • Figure 29: Seafood consumption: Chinese Canadians vs overall population, September 2017
                                          • Frozen is the top fish and/or seafood format
                                            • Figure 30: Fish/seafood combined usage, by format, September 2017
                                            • Figure 31: Fish and seafood consumption, by format, September 2017
                                            • Figure 32: President’s Choice Shrimp Burgers (Canada), June 2017
                                            • Figure 33: Marina del Rey Wild Argentinian Shrimp Burgers (Canada), November 2017
                                            • Figure 34: Fish/seafood (combined) consumption format, by age, September 2017
                                            • Figure 35: Fish/seafood (combined) consumption format, by parental status, September 2017
                                        • Reasons for Eating Fish and/or Seafood

                                          • Taste is the top reason for eating fish and/or seafood
                                            • Figure 36: Reasons for eating fish and/or seafood, September 2017
                                            • Figure 37: ‘Like the taste” as a reason for eating fish and/or seafood, by age, September 2017
                                            • Figure 38: ‘Like the taste” and “complements another food” as reasons for eating fish and/or seafood, Chinese Canadians vs overall population, September 2017
                                          • “Good fats” exceed “heart health” as a health-related reason for eating fish
                                            • Figure 39: ‘Good fats” and “heart health” as reasons for eating fish and/or seafood, by age, September 2017
                                            • Figure 40: “Heart health” as reason for eating fish and/or seafood, by age and gender, September 2017
                                            • Figure 41: “Heart health” and “meat substitution” as reasons for eating fish and/or seafood, over-55s by gender, September 2017
                                          • Younger adults more likely to view fish and/or seafood as a complement to other dishes
                                            • Figure 42: “Complements another food” as reason for eating fish and/or seafood, 18-24s vs overall population, September 2017
                                          • ‘Sustainably caught’ a factor for a third of consumers
                                            • Figure 43: “Sustainably caught” as an attribute in making fish and/or seafood purchase, by gender and household income, September 2017
                                        • Barriers to Eating Fish

                                          • Taste and smell are the largest barriers to fish/seafood consumption
                                            • Figure 44: Top reasons for not eating fish and/or seafood, September 2017
                                          • Secondary considerations offer low barriers to usage
                                            • Figure 45: Secondary reasons for not eating fish and/or seafood, September 2017
                                        • Purchase Considerations for Fish and/or Seafood

                                            • Figure 46: Attributes considered when purchasing fish and/or seafood, September 2017
                                          • “Larger servings” matter more for seafood
                                            • Figure 47: “Larger servings” as a factor considered when purchasing seafood, by age, September 2017
                                          • Price is the most important factor for consumers
                                            • Figure 48: “Price” as a factor when purchasing fish and/or seafood, by age, September 2017
                                            • Figure 49: “Price” as a factor when purchasing fish and/or seafood, by financial situation, September 2017
                                          • Convenience and clarity emerge as important purchase drivers
                                            • Figure 50: Can't Mess It Up! Maple Dijon Wild Pink Salmon (Canada), July 2017
                                          • Where fish is sourced and what’s in it matter
                                            • Figure 51: Select attributes considered when purchasing fish and/or seafood, by age, September 2017
                                        • Consumer Groups

                                          • Canadians eat more fish than Americans
                                            • Figure 52: Retail processed fish volume consumption per capita, Canada vs US, 2008-16
                                            • Figure 53: Reasons for consumption of fish and/or seafood, Canada vs US, September 2017 (Canada)/August 2016 (US)
                                          • Chinese Canadians eat more seafood
                                              • Figure 54: Fish/seafood combined usage, by format, Chinese Canadians vs overall population September 2017
                                            • Convenience and satiation vital for parents
                                              • Figure 55: Fish and/or seafood eaten as “part of a frozen meal”, by parental status, September 2017
                                              • Figure 56: Importance of select attributes when purchasing, by parental status, September 2017
                                          • Appendix – Data Sources and Abbreviations

                                            • Data sources
                                              • Sales data
                                                • Fan chart forecast
                                                  • Consumer survey data
                                                    • Abbreviations and terms
                                                      • Abbreviations

                                                      Fish and Seafood - Canada - November 2017

                                                      US $3,995.00 (Excl.Tax)