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Meat - Canada - October 2016

"Canadians remain avid consumers of meat products, yet this does not mean the industry is without its challenges. Canada’s changing population dynamic from a generational and immigration perspective means producers and retailers will need to continually adapt in order to address evolving preferences with respect to flavours and type (of meat). While chicken ranks as the most popular type of meat for Canadians, younger consumers show a greater openness to eating ‘alternative’ options such as duck/goose and game meats (eg venison), which suggests a broadening palette."
- Joel Gregoire, Senior Food and Drink Analyst

This report discusses the following key topics:

  • Inflation driving meat value sales growth
  • Young women less likely to eat meat

Much of meat’s long-term value sales growth has come as a result of inflationary pressures leading to nearly a third of Canadians agreeing they “now eat less meat because it’s become too expensive”. That said, while a third of consumers are detracted by the increasing price of meat, a third of Canadians also agree that high quality meat is worth paying more for (eg Wagyu or Angus Beef). This supports the need for targeted and tiered product development, pricing and messaging to support volume growth while maximizing profitability and spurring on category innovation. Other factors, such as transparency in animal husbandry and education in preparation are important in meeting the needs of select portions of Canadians.

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Table of contents

  1. Overview

    • What you need to know
      • Definition
        • Meat types
          • Meat formats
            • Market sizing breaks
            • Executive Summary

              • The issues
                • Inflation driving meat value sales growth
                  • Figure 1: Volume vs value growth for processed meat, 2010-15
                • Young women less likely to eat meat
                  • Figure 2: Meat typically purchased to be eaten at home, women 18-34 vs overall population, August 2016
                • The opportunities
                  • Canadians want to know what goes into their meat
                    • Figure 3: Interest in how meat is raised or what goes into it, August 2016
                  • Young men represent an opportunity for premium meat options
                    • Figure 4: Percent of consumers who agree high quality meat is worth paying more for, by age and gender, August 2016
                  • A third of Canadian are interested in internationally-inspired meat flavours
                    • Figure 5: Interest in international meat formats and flavours, August 2016
                  • Meat brings protein to mini-meals
                    • Figure 6: Interest in snack kits that include processed meats, August 2016
                  • What it means
                  • The Market – What You Need to Know

                    • Price inflation serves as the primary driver behind processed meat sales growth
                      • Growing income disparity bolsters need for cost effective offerings
                      • Market Size and Forecast

                        • Price inflation serves as the primary driver behind processed meat sales growth
                          • Figure 7: Total Canada processed meat value sales and fan chart forecast of market, at current prices, 2011-21
                          • Figure 8: Total Canada processed meat volume sales and fan chart forecast of market, 2011-21
                          • Figure 9: Total Canada processed meat sales and forecast of market, at current prices, 2011-21
                        • Chilled meat remains the dominant format for Canadians
                          • Figure 10: Processed meat retail market segmentation by volume (% share), 2011-15
                      • Market Factors

                        • Immigration fuelling Canada’s population growth
                          • Figure 11: Foreign-born share of population by G8 country and Australia
                        • Growing income disparity bolsters need for cost effective offerings
                          • Figure 12: Percentage share of wealth (or net worth), by quintile, 1999 & 2012
                        • Balancing consumers’ demand for sustainability with efficiency
                        • Key Players – What You Need to Know

                          • Canadians want to know what’s in their meat
                            • Craft moves to meat
                              • Looking abroad for new meat innovations
                              • What’s In?

                                • Canadians want to know what’s in (and what’s not in) the meat they eat
                                  • Figure 13: President’s Choice Free From Rosemary & Thyme Chicken Breasts (Canada), May 2015
                                  • Figure 14: Maple Leaf Prime Naturally Extra Lean Ground Chicken (Canada), December 2015
                                • 2015 sees increase in meat alternative launches in Canada
                                  • Figure 15: Linda McCartney Foods Vegetarian Mozzarella ¼ lb burgers (UK), July 2016
                                  • Figure 16: VeGourmet Vegan Cordon Bleu (France), April 2016
                                  • Figure 17: Simplot Cheese & Spinach (Australia), July 2016
                              • What’s Out?

                                • Beef’s popularity challenged based on shifts in generational and ethnic preferences
                                • What’s Next?

                                  • Meat capitalizing on craft movement
                                    • Figure 18: Maple Leaf Canadian Craft Okanagan Inspired Garlic & Herb Salami, May 2016 and Quebec Maple Ham, August 2016
                                    • Figure 19: President’s Choice Black Label Wagyu Burgers, June 2014
                                  • Meat offers meaningful snack options
                                    • Figure 20: Maple Leaf Natural Selection Protinis Shaved Turkey & Cheddar (Canada), August 2015 and Trimmed Prosciutto & Provolone (Canada), July 2015
                                    • Figure 21: Jack Link’s Sriracha Beef Jerky (Canada), March 2016
                                    • Figure 22: McSweeny’s Canadian Maple Flavour Pork Jerky (Canada), March 2016
                                    • Figure 23: Lawless Jerky Mango Habanero Beef Jerky (USA), July 2016
                                    • Figure 24: Oscar Mayer P3 Hickory Seasoned Grilled Chicken Breast Strips Portable Protein Pack (USA), September 2015 and Rotisserie Seasoned Chicken Portable Protein Pack (USA), November 2015
                                  • Looking abroad for new meat innovations
                                    • Figure 25: Top cooking sauce flavours launched in Asia Pacific, 2011-15 (combined)
                                    • Figure 26: Popularity of ethnic-inspired food flavours, November 2015
                                • The Consumer – What You Need to Know

                                  • Fresh is best for consumers
                                    • Price leads among the top factors that drive meat purchase decisions
                                      • Canadians care about what goes into their meat
                                        • Younger consumers are more open to ‘different’ meat options
                                          • Canadians are looking for preparation help
                                          • Consumers’ Attitudes towards Meat

                                            • Meat is indispensable for a third of Canadians
                                              • Figure 27: Select attitudes towards meat, by gender, August 2016
                                              • Figure 28: Pulled Soy Protein with BBQ Sauce (Sweden, October 2016)
                                            • Women and older consumers likely to moderate
                                              • Figure 29: Percent of consumers who agree they “try to moderate how much meat they eat to watch their health”, August 2016
                                            • Fresh is best for consumers
                                              • Increasing cost of meat a deterrent for a third of Canadians
                                                • Figure 30: Percent of consumers who look for sales or now eat less meat because of price, by household income bracket, August 2016
                                              • Young men are most likely to be meat aficionados
                                                • Figure 31: Select attitudes towards meat, men aged 18-24 vs overall population, August 2016
                                              • Clear divide in the meat products consumers view more and less positively
                                                • Figure 32: Correspondence analysis – Meat drivers, August 2016
                                              • Canadians view frozen meat as an affordable and convenient option
                                              • Meat Purchase Behaviours

                                                • Chicken rules the roost, while young women turn away from beef
                                                  • Figure 33: Types of meat Canadians are most likely to purchase, August 2016
                                                • Younger consumers more open to ‘different’ meat options
                                                  • Figure 34: Types of meat Canadians are most likely to purchase, 18-44s vs over-45s, August 2016
                                                  • Figure 35: M&S Spirit of Summer BBQ Grill Venison Burgers (UK, May 2016)
                                                  • Figure 36: Aldi Good Choice Wild Venison Stew (Switzerland, September 2016)
                                                • Age impacts where consumers purchase meat products
                                                  • Figure 37: Where consumers purchase meat (select locations), by age, August 2016
                                                • Parents core target for hot dogs/sausages, but different messaging resonates for moms and dads
                                                  • Figure 38: Meat formats Canadians most likely to eat (any location), August 2016
                                                  • Figure 39: Select associations moms and dads make towards processed non-sliced meats (eg hot dogs), August 2016
                                                • Sliced meats underdeveloped among Chinese Canadians
                                                  • Figure 40: Dunn’s Montreal Smoked Meat (Canada), August, 2016
                                                • Opportunity to grow under-developed canned meat category
                                                  • Figure 41: Clover Leaf Toppers Lemon Pepper, Mediterranean Sauce and Mild Curry Sauce, (Canada, April 2015)
                                                • What Canadians are eating more and less of – In their own words
                                                • Meat Purchase Decision Factors

                                                  • Price leads among the top factors that drive Canadians’ meat purchase decisions
                                                    • Figure 42: Factors consumers consider when choosing different meat products, August 2016
                                                  • “What’s for dinner?” is the most important question companies can help answer
                                                    • A third of Canadians look for free-from meats and consider a product’s source
                                                      • Figure 43: Factors women consider when choosing different meat products, by age, August 2016
                                                    • Freshness is a key consideration for consumers
                                                      • Figure 44: Importance of price and the best-before date when choosing meat products, Quebecers vs overall population, August 2016
                                                      • Figure 45: Importance of price and the best-before date when choosing meat products, French vs English speakers, August 2016
                                                  • Areas of Interest in Meat

                                                    • Canadians care about what goes into their meat
                                                      • Figure 46: Top areas of interest in meat, August 2016
                                                      • Figure 47: Select areas of interest in meat, men vs women, August 2016
                                                    • Canadians are looking for preparation help
                                                      • Craft comes to meat
                                                        • Figure 48: Maple Leaf Canadian Craft, Atlantic Coarse Salt Prosciutto, (Canada, May 2016)
                                                        • Figure 49: Maple Leaf Canadian Craft, Canadian Whisky and Apple Bacon, (Canada, May 2016)
                                                        • Figure 50: Maple Leaf Canadian Craft, Montreal Style Smoked Wieners, (Canada, May 2016)
                                                      • Bringing the world of meat to Canada
                                                        • Figure 51: Interest in ‘internationally-inspired spices/sauces/rubs’, by age and gender, August 2016
                                                        • Figure 52: Interest in ‘internationally-inspired formats’, by age and gender, August 2016
                                                      • Meat and mini-meals
                                                      • Meat – Canada vs The US

                                                        • Meat mix differs between Canadians and Americans
                                                          • Figure 53: Retail market volume consumption per capita, Canada vs US, 2010-14
                                                          • Figure 54: Retail market volume consumption per capita by segment, Canada vs US, 2014
                                                      • Appendix – Data Sources and Abbreviations

                                                        • Data sources
                                                          • Sales data
                                                            • Fan chart forecast
                                                              • Consumer survey data
                                                                • Correspondence analysis
                                                                  • Consumer qualitative research
                                                                    • Abbreviations and terms
                                                                      • Abbreviations

                                                                      Companies Covered

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                                                                      Meat - Canada - October 2016

                                                                      US $3,995.00 (Excl.Tax)