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Snacking Eating Habits - Motivations and Attitudes - Canada - September 2016

Snacking is truly the fourth meal of the day for Canadians with its popularity extending to both in and out of home. Snacking is an adaptable occasion, and as such so must be manufacturers, retailers and foodservice operators to compete in the space. While health in snacking is important for many Canadians, it cannot be whittled down to only that area. Consumers also see snacking to enhance experiences, be a stand-in for a traditional meal and even as a support when stressed. The demands of snacking also change throughout the day with the need for health in the morning morphing into the desire for indulgence in the evening. Genders and age groups also have different needs and levels of demand from their snacks, and as such companies need to clearly identify what need they are or can meet to carve out their share of the preverbal pie when it comes to snacking.

This report examines the following issues:

  • Older Canadians underdeveloped in snacking
  • Ice cream sales growth frosty (over the long term)

Definitions

Snack foods:

  • Fruit or vegetables
  • Salty snack (eg chips, Cheezies, popcorn, nuts, etc)
  • Ice cream or frozen treats
  • Snack/granola/energy bar
  • Cheese (eg cheese sticks, cottage cheese)
  • Sweet baked goods (eg muffins, donuts, etc)
  • Yogurt/ drinkable yogurt
  • Crackers
  • Foods typically eaten during traditional meals (small burger, pizza, etc)
  • Dips (hummus, chip dip, salsa, etc).

Snack venues:

  • Brought it from home
  • From a store (eg grocery store, convenience store, etc)
  • From a restaurant or food truck (eg eat in or takeout)
  • At an entertainment venue (eg movie, sports arena/stadium, etc)
  • From a cafeteria (eg work or school)
  • Got it from a vending machine.

Dayparts:

  • Morning
  • Before breakfast
  • In place of breakfast
  • Between breakfast and lunch
  • Afternoon
  • In place of lunch
  • Between lunch and dinner
  • Evening
  • In place of dinner
  • In the evening/before bed
  • Late/middle of the night.

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Table of contents

  1. Overview

    • What you need to know
      • Definition
      • Executive Summary

        • The issues
          • Older Canadians underdeveloped in snacking
            • Figure 1: Share of consumers who have eaten snacks in the past “week”, by location, over-65s vs overall population, July 2016
          • Ice cream sales growth frosty (over the long term)
            • Figure 2: Retail market value growth in Canada of select categories, 2015 vs 2010
          • The opportunities
            • Snacking demand evolved with the day
              • Figure 3: Correspondence map – Relationship between types of snacks eaten and dayparts, July 2016
            • Women are more likely to be influenced by health and function when selecting snacks
              • Figure 4: Interest in snack, by gender, July 2016
            • Young Canadians are avid snackers
              • Figure 5: Share of consumers who have eaten snacks in the “past week”, by location, 18-24s vs overall population, July 2016
            • What it means
            • The Market – What You Need to Know

              • Canadians are more time-pressed
                • Canada’s aging population represents a potential shift in breakfast eating habits
                  • Snacking is well positioned to contribute to Canadians’ health
                  • Market Factors

                    • Canadians are more time-pressed
                      • Focus on health and weight management to continue
                        • Figure 6: Body mass index, self-reported rate of being overweight or obese among Canadian adults, by gender, 2010-14
                      • Canada’s aging population represents a potential challenge in snacking habits
                        • Figure 7: Population aged 65 years and over in Canada, historical and projected (% of total), 1971-2061
                    • Key Players – What You Need to Know

                      • Drinkable snacks quench demand in snacking
                        • Canadians looking for new snack flavours and customization
                          • Snacking behaviour wanes among Canada’s seniors
                          • What’s Working?

                            • The iGeneration are looking for iSnacks
                              • Figure 8: Kellogg's Special K Nourish Cranberry & Almonds Chewy Bars (Canada, March 2016), Dark Chocolate Chunks & Almonds Chewy Bars (Canada, March 2016)
                            • Canadians are thirsty for drinkable snacks
                              • Figure 9: Tim Hortons Iced Capp Vanilla, Original and Mocha (Canada, August 2016)
                              • Figure 10: iogo Raspberry-Strawberry & Vanilla Drinkable Yogurts and iogo nano Strawberry Drinkable Yogurt (Canada, August 2016)
                              • Figure 11: Lassonde Oasis SmoOthie Strawberry and Banana Smoothie (Canada, August 2016)
                              • Figure 12: True Organic Kaleifornia Juice Smoothie (Canada, August 2016)
                              • Figure 13: Bolthouse Farms C-Boost 100% Fruit Juice Smoothie (Canada, August 2016)
                          • What’s Struggling?

                            • Ice cream growth frosty versus other snack food categories
                              • Figure 14: Retail market value growth in Canada of select categories, 2015 vs 2010
                            • Snacking behaviour wanes among Canada’s seniors
                              • Figure 15: Past week’s snack usage by location, over-65s vs overall population, July 2016
                              • Figure 16: Foods eaten as a snack in the past week, over-65s vs overall population, July 2016
                          • What’s Next?

                            • Canadians looking for new snack flavours and customization
                              • Figure 17: Tanka trail Turkey & Buffalo Jerky with Cranberries and Mango Pepper Trail Mix (US, May 2016), Buffalo Cranberry Bites and Coconut Almond Trail Mix (US, February 2016) and Buffalo Cranberry Bites and Blueberry Almond Trail Mix (US, February 2016)
                            • Snacks with ‘purpose’ stand out
                              • Figure 18: Danone Activia Probiotic Yogurt Assortment (Canada, June 2016)
                            • Blurred lines between meals and snacks
                            • The Consumer – What You Need to Know

                              • Top snack foods eaten suggest divide in motivations
                                • Health in snacking holds multiple meanings to Canadians
                                  • Associations with snacking changes throughout the day
                                    • Young Canadians core target in snacking
                                      • Women are more likely to associate snacking with health
                                      • The Where, When and What of Snacking

                                        • Battle for share in where Canadians get their snacks
                                          • Figure 19: Where Canadians sourced snacks from in the past week, July 2016
                                          • Figure 20: Where Canadians sourced snacks from in the past week, by daypart, July 2016
                                        • Afternoon is ‘prime time’ for snacking in Canada
                                          • Figure 21: Where Canadians sourced snacks from in the past week, by daypart (detailed), July 2016
                                          • Figure 22: Attributes used to describe snack foods eaten during the afternoon, 18-24s vs overall population, July 2016
                                        • Top snack foods eaten suggest divide in motivations
                                          • Figure 23: Top foods eaten as a snack, July 2016
                                          • Figure 24: Oh Yeah! One Peanut Butter Pie Flavour Protein Bar (Canada, August 2016)
                                          • Figure 25: Quest Nutrition S’mores Flavoured Protein Bar (Canada, August 2016)
                                          • Figure 26: Dannon Light & Fit Greek Crunch (US, August 2016)
                                          • Figure 27: Iogo Probio Kefir Strawberry Probiotic Fermented Milk (Canada, June 2016)
                                          • Figure 28: President’s Choice Vanilla Bean Kefir Probiotic Fermented Milk (Canada, April 2016)
                                          • Figure 29: Lightly Caramelized Low-Fat Yogurt: Mango & Coconut, Acai & Banana, Coconut & Guava (US, August 2016)
                                      • Motivations and Attitudes towards Snacking

                                        • Nutrition holds multiple meanings to Canadians
                                          • Figure 30: Percentage of those who eat ‘healthy’ snacks, by daypart, July 2016
                                          • Figure 31: Smartfood White Cheddar Seasoned Popcorn (Canada, March 2016), and Smartfood Delight White Cheddar Flavour Popcorn (Canada, May 2016)
                                        • In their own words: What Canadians want from snacks (related to health)
                                          • Portable snacks help prepare consumers for an increasingly on-the-go life
                                            • Figure 32: Percent of women who agree “I prefer carrying snack from home rather than buying them while I am out”, by age, July 2016
                                          • Snacking is important to the daily routine of a quarter of Canadians
                                            • Figure 33: Agreement with statements regarding snacking and routine, July 2016
                                          • Younger Canadians open to versatility in format and flavour
                                            • Figure 34: Interest in non-traditional snack food combinations and international snack foods and flavours, by age, July 2016
                                        • Innovation Opportunities in Snacking

                                          • Canadians look to snacking to “fill” their hunger
                                            • Figure 35: Areas of interest in snacking, July 2016
                                            • Figure 36: Interest in “snacks or snack kits that ‘fill me up’”, by age and gender, July 2016
                                          • A third of Canadians snack with purpose
                                            • Figure 37: Lotte Attention Chewing Gum (South Korea, August 2016)
                                            • Figure 38: Grainny’s Coco-Curves (India, November 2015)
                                          • Associations with snacking change throughout the day
                                            • Figure 39: Correspondence map – Relationship between types of snacks eaten and dayparts, July 2016
                                          • Shareable snack sizes and formats
                                            • Figure 40: Interest in shareable snack sizes among 18-24s, by gender, July 2016
                                          • Apportioning self-control
                                            • Consumers looking for a fresh perspective on snacking
                                            • Snacking by Population Segment

                                              • Health and functionality prove more important to women
                                                • Figure 41: Interest in snack, by gender, July 2016
                                                • Figure 42: Attitudes towards snacking, by gender, July 2016
                                              • Snacking a core pillar in how younger Canadians eat
                                                • Figure 43: Share of consumers who have eaten snacks in the “past week”, by location, 18-24s vs the overall population, July 2016
                                              • Quebec less likely to replace meals with snacks from home
                                                • Figure 44: Share of consumers who have eaten snacks from home in the “past week”, by daypart, Quebec vs overall, July 2016
                                              • Chinese Canadians prove a “hot” opportunity for snacking
                                                • Figure 45: Select areas of interest around snacking, Chinese Canadians vs overall population, July 2016
                                                • Figure 46: Happy Planet Matcha Green Tea Smoothie (Canada, November 2015)
                                              • Similarities outweigh nuanced differences when comparing snacking in Canada and the US
                                                • Figure 47: Retail market volume consumption per capita (population) in KG, US vs Canada, 2015
                                                • Figure 48: Associations with “healthy”, by daypart, US (January 2015) vs Canada (July 2016)
                                            • Appendix – Data Sources and Abbreviations

                                              • Data sources
                                                • Consumer survey data
                                                  • Consumer qualitative research
                                                    • Correspondence analysis
                                                      • Abbreviations and terms
                                                        • Abbreviations

                                                        Companies Covered

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                                                        Snacking Eating Habits - Motivations and Attitudes - Canada - September 2016

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