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Canada Chocolate and Non-Chocolate Confectionary Market Report

Everything you need to make the right decisions

Providing the most comprehensive and up-to-date information and analysis of the Chocolate and Non-Chocolate Confectionary market, and the behaviours, preferences and habits of the consumer.

Mintel has the answers you’re looking for

What are the key challenges facing the industry? Who is the consumer and what do they want? Where are the opportunities, where are the risks and what lies ahead?

Covered in this report

For the purposes of this report, Mintel has used the following definitions for chocolate and non-chocolate confectionery.

Chocolate confectionery:

  • Individual chocolate bars (eg Kit Kat)
  • Bags/boxes of chocolates (eg individually wrapped or nonwrapped)
  • Larger format chocolate bars (eg tablets)
  • Chocolate sold in loose form (eg bulk section of store)
  • Other chocolate

Non-chocolate confectionery:

  • Chewy candy (eg gummies)
  • Other non-chocolate candy
  • Toffee/caramel/nougat
  • Hard candy
  • Liquorice
  • Lollipops

Expert analysis from a specialist in the field

Written by Joel Gregoire, a leading analyst in the Food & Drink sector, his extensive knowledge delivers in-depth commentary and analysis to highlight current trends and add expert context to the numbers.

Canadians have a sweet tooth. They show a love for chocolate and for non-chocolate candy by virtue of the sheer number of Canadians who claim they turn to these categories. While Canadians may like what’s familiar to them, there is also a notable portion that cite interest in options that are innovative when it comes to flavour Joel Gregoire
Associate Director - Food & Drink

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Table of contents

  1. Overview

    • What you need to know
      • Definition
        • Consumer feedback
          • Market size definition
          • Executive Summary

            • The issues
              • Health-related concerns influencing category innovation
                • Figure 1: Top areas of interest around chocolate and non-chocolate confectionery, November 2018
              • Canada’s aging population represents a possible challenge to growth
                • Figure 2: Chocolate and non-chocolate candy usage, November 2018
              • The opportunities
                • Confectionery positioned as a ‘functional’ option
                  • Figure 3: Interest in health-boosting ingredients, women 18-34-years-old vs overall, November 2018
                • Candy’s not just for kids according to Canadians
                  • Figure 4: Interest in adult-focused flavours, by age, November 2018
                • Canadians equate chocolate with emotional well-being
                  • Figure 5: Attitudes around chocolate supporting emotional well-being, by gender, November 2018
                • Canadians are willing to pay more for better quality chocolate
                  • Figure 6: Willingness to pay more for higher quality chocolate, by age, November 2018
                • What it means
                • The Market – What You Need to Know

                  • Chocolate value sales predicted to grow at a healthy clip
                    • Chocolate tablets shows upward momentum
                      • Sugar confection expected to grow at a tepid pace
                      • Market Size and Forecast

                        • Chocolate value sales predicted to grow at a healthy clip
                          • Figure 7: Canada retail value sales and fan chart forecast of chocolate confectionery market, at current prices, 2013-23
                          • Figure 8: Canada retail value sales and forecast of chocolate confectionery market, at current prices, 2013-23
                          • Figure 9: Canada retail volume sales and fan chart forecast of retail chocolate confectionery market, 2013-23
                        • Sugar confection expected to grow at a tepid pace
                          • Figure 10: Canada volume sales and fan chart forecast of retail sugar & gum confectionery market, at current prices, 2013-23
                          • Figure 11: Total Canada volume sales and forecast of retail sugar & gum confectionery market, at current prices, 2013-23
                          • Figure 12: Canada retail value sales of sugar confectionery vs gum confectionery, 2017
                      • Market Breakdown

                        • Chocolate tablets segment shows upward momentum
                          • Figure 13: Retail value sales of chocolate confectionery, by segment, 2015-17
                          • Figure 14: Retail volume sales of chocolate confectionery, by segment, 2015-17
                        • Sugar confectionery’s growth broadly extends across segments
                          • Figure 15: Retail value sales of sugar confectionery, by segment, 2016-17
                          • Figure 16: Retail volume sales of sugar confectionery, by segment, 2016-17
                        • Distinct differences in value versus volume sales by chocolate company
                          • Figure 17: Percent share of retail value and volume sales of chocolate confectionery, by company, 2017
                        • Sugar confectionery market concentrated in tree companies
                          • Figure 18: Percent share of retail value and volume sales of sugar confectionery, by company, 2017
                      • Market Factors

                        • Canadians strive to eat healthy most of the time…
                          • Figure 19: Healthy eating, November 2016
                        • ...but flexibility may be contributing to the high obesity rates
                          • Figure 20: Body mass index, self-reported rate of being overweight or obese among Canadian adults, by gender, 2010-14
                        • Canada’s aging population may be a headwind for confections
                          • Figure 21: Population aged 65 years and over in Canada, historical and projected (% of total), 1971-2061
                        • Canadians are more time-pressed
                        • Key Players – What You Need to Know

                          • Confections’ edge being softened by ‘better-for-you’ innovation
                            • Alcoholic flavours can address demand for adult flavours
                            • What’s Working?

                              • Tablets’ growth a reflection of changing category dynamics
                                • Figure 22: Share of retail value sales of chocolate confectionery, by segment, 2017
                            • Challenges

                              • Concerns around sugar a watch-out for the industry
                              • What’s Next?

                                • Alcoholic flavours a means to offer adult experiences
                                  • Figure 23: Raaka Bourbon Cask Aged Unroasted Dark Chocolate (USA), December 2018
                                  • Figure 24: Raaka Cabernet Sauvignon Unroasted Dark Chocolate Bar (USA), December 2018
                                  • Figure 25: Ghirardelli Chocolate Squares Dark Chocolate Bourbon Caramel (USA), June 2018
                                  • Figure 26: Lolli & Pops Strawberry Champaign Chocolate Bar (USA), April 2018
                                  • Figure 27: Sugarfina Bourbon Bears (USA), November 2018
                                  • Figure 28: Project 7 Sparkling Mimosa Gourmet Gummies (USA), September 2018
                                • Confections’ indulgent edge softened by examples of ‘better-for-you’ positioning
                                  • Figure 29: EatingEVOLVED Original Keto Cups (USA), November 2018
                                  • Figure 30: Theo Coconut Turmeric Chocolate Clusters (USA), March 2017
                                  • Figure 31: Zazubean Hottie Chili & Cinnamon Dark Chocolate with Yerba Matte (Canada), January 2016
                                  • Figure 32: Natierra Himalania Organic Dark Chocolate Covered Chia Seeds (Canada), January 2016
                                  • Figure 33: Biena Foods Dark Chocolate Chick Peas (USA), July 2018
                                • Chocolate in emerging snack-kit category
                                  • Figure 34: Kraft Trios Snackfulls Extra Sharp White Cheddar Cheese, Dried Cranberries & Semisweet Chocolate (USA), July 2018
                                  • Figure 35: Nestlé Kit Kat Snax Sweet & Salty Snack Mix (Canada), December 2018
                              • The Consumer – What You Need to Know

                                • Nearly all Canadians eat chocolate and candy
                                  • Confections and TV are the most ideal match for Canadians
                                    • Confection made with natural sugars are of interest to Canadians
                                      • Flavour and brand are the top considerations for consumers
                                        • Consumers look to chocolate for its emotional benefits
                                          • Candy is not just for kids
                                          • Chocolate and Candy Usage

                                            • Nearly all Canadians eat chocolate and candy
                                              • Figure 36: Consumption of chocolate and non-chocolate confectionery in the past three months, November 2018
                                              • Figure 37: Motts Fruitsations + Veggie Assorted Fruit Flavoured Snacks (Canada), August 2017
                                              • Figure 38: Welch’s Jelly Beans (US), March 2018
                                            • Younger adults are more likely to eat confections, meaning opportunity exists to close-the-gap with older consumers.
                                              • Figure 39: Consumption of chocolate and non-chocolate confectionery in the past three months, by age, November 2018
                                              • Figure 40: Consumption of chocolate and non-chocolate confectionery (select) in the past three months, by parental status, November 2018
                                              • Figure 41: Consumption of chocolate and non-chocolate confectionery (select) in the past three months, Quebec vs overall population, November 2018
                                              • Figure 42: Consumption of chocolate and non-chocolate confectionery (select) in the past three months, Chinese Canadians vs overall population, November 2018
                                            • Most Canadians eat chocolate and candy on a weekly basis
                                              • Figure 43: Frequency chocolate or non-chocolate confectionery consumption, November 2018
                                            • Opportunity for candy to drive more frequent usage versus chocolate
                                              • Figure 44: Frequency chocolate and non-chocolate confectionery consumption, November 2018
                                              • Figure 45: Frequency non-chocolate confectionery, by parental status, November 2018
                                              • Figure 46: Oreo Dippers, October 2017
                                          • Choice Factors

                                            • Flavour and brand are the top considerations for consumers
                                              • Figure 47: Important factors when choosing chocolate or candy, November 2018
                                              • Figure 48: Important factors when choosing chocolate and candy, November 2018
                                            • Making confections “easy to find” is more important for younger consumers
                                              • Figure 49: Importance of “easy to find” when choosing chocolate or candy, November 2018
                                            • Ethically-sourced ingredients hold relatively limited appeal
                                              • Figure 50: Importance of “ethically sourced” when choosing chocolate or candy, women 35-44 vs overall, November 2018
                                            • Ingredients are the most impactful way to communicate health
                                              • Figure 51: Importance of “health-related factors” when choosing chocolate or candy, under-44s vs over-45s, November 2018
                                          • Occasions

                                            • Confections and TV are the most ideal match for Canadians
                                              • Figure 52: When chocolate or candy is eaten, November 2018
                                              • Figure 53: M&M’S® Movies, April 2017
                                              • Figure 54: Chocolate eaten “while watching TV” or “As a snack in the evening”, under-44s vs over-45s, November 2018
                                            • The afternoon is a ‘battleground’ occasion for confectioners
                                              • Figure 55: Chocolate or candy as an afternoon snack, by age and population segment, November 2018
                                              • Figure 56: Chocolate or candy is eaten “just after meals” or “when studying/working”, Chinese Canadians^ vs overall population, November 2018
                                            • Canadians are more likely to enjoy confections on their own
                                              • Figure 57: Chocolate or candy eaten “while alone” or “with other people”, by age, November 2018
                                          • Innovation Opportunities

                                            • Confection made with natural sugars of interest to Canadians
                                              • Figure 58: Areas of interest, November 2018
                                              • Figure 59: Interest in “made with natural sugars” and “health boosting ingredients”, moms vs Overall, November 2018
                                            • Less is more with smaller portions equating to permissibility
                                              • Figure 60: Interest in “smaller portions, but richer flavours”, November 2018
                                            • Younger consumers show greater interest in ‘exploration’
                                              • Figure 61: Interest in flavours innovation, by age, November 2018
                                            • Demand for vegan confections requires context
                                              • Figure 62: Interest in vegan option, women 18-34 vs overall, November 2018
                                              • Figure 63: Endangered Species Chocolate Dark Chocolate with Raspberries (Canada), November 2018
                                              • Figure 64: Free2b Sun Cups Minis Candy Filled with Creamy Sunflower Seed Butter (Canada), May 2018
                                              • Figure 65: Theobroma Chocolat Organic 60% Cacoa with Orange Chunks (Canada), March 2018
                                          • Attitudes toward Confectionery

                                            • Consumers look to chocolate for its emotional benefits
                                              • Figure 66: Attitudes toward chocolate, women vs men, November 2018
                                              • Figure 67: Stirs the Soul Honey Lavender Conscious Raw Chocolate (USA), January 2017
                                              • Figure 68: Prana Organic Chocolate Matcha Magic Dark Chocolate Bark with Roasted Sesame, Crispy Rice & Matcha (USA), September 2018
                                              • Figure 69: Two Moms in The Raw Soul Sprout (USA), January 2017
                                            • Candy is not just for kids
                                              • Figure 70: Attitudes toward candy, November 2018
                                              • Figure 71: PUR Mints Mojito Sugar Free Mints, (Canada), December 2018
                                              • Figure 72: Truly Ginger Crystallized Ginger Mints Mojito Sugar Free Mints, (Canada), December 2018
                                              • Figure 73: Neva La Neige Vanilla Flavored European Gourmet Marshmallows (USA), December 2018
                                          • Appendix – Data Sources and Abbreviations

                                            • Data sources
                                              • Consumer survey data
                                                • Consumer qualitative research
                                                  • Abbreviations and terms