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Description

Description

"Sweet baked goods are engrained into the Canadian diet. Indeed, donuts are up there with the most Canadian of foods along with peameal bacon and maple syrup. Despite this, challenges nevertheless exist. One barrier for consumers is health. While it may not prove credible to position sweet baked goods as a ‘health food’, companies can engage in tactics that broaden the appeal of the category throughout the day, including as a snack with benefits. Companies can also look to remain current with contemporary flavour trends and extend beyond traditional format norms in the category in order to drive frequency and look to grow penetration. This Report will provide findings based on consumer feedback and examples that can be used as a tool in a company’s kit in informing go-forward innovation and messaging strategies."
- Joel Gregoire, Senior Research Analyst, Food & Beverage

This Report discusses the following key topics:

  • Sugar represents a concern for Canadians 
  • Young women more likely to perceive sweet baked goods to be bad for their health

What's included

What's included

Table of contents

Table of contents

  1. Overview

    • What you need to know
      • Definition
      • Executive Summary

        • The issues
          • Sugar represents a concern for Canadians
            • Figure 1: Purchase factors around sweet baked goods related to health, February 2017
          • Young women more likely to perceive sweet baked goods to be bad for their health
            • Figure 2: “Sweet baked goods are bad for my health” (% agree), women 18-24 vs overall population, February 2017
          • The opportunities
            • Multiple tactics available to address health concerns
              • Figure 3: Interest in better-for-you sweet baked goods innovations, women vs men, February 2017
            • Snacking represents a growth opportunity
              • Figure 4: Statements about beverage pairings and snacking (% agree), 18-24s vs overall population, February 2017
            • Baking an enjoyable activity for many Canadians
              • Figure 5: “I enjoy baking from scratch”, men by age, February 2017
            • Category blurring a continued path to format and flavour innovation
              • Figure 6: Interest in sweet baked goods innovations (% agree), February 2017
            • What it means
            • The Market – What You Need to Know

              • Price inflation primary driver of sweet bakery growth
                • Baking can address pressures faced by time-pressed Canadians in different ways
                  • Accommodation required to address differences among older and younger Canadians
                  • Market Size and Forecast

                    • Value sales growth for sweet bakery forecasted to surpass volume sales growth through 2021
                      • Figure 7: Retail Canadian value sales and fan chart forecast of sweet bakery, at current prices, 2011-21
                      • Figure 8: Retail Canadian volume sales and fan chart forecast of sweet bakery, 2011-21
                      • Figure 9: Retail Canadian sales and forecast of sweet bakery, at current prices, 2011-21
                    • Value growth of biscuits (cookies and crackers) to continue upward momentum
                      • Figure 10: Retail Canadian value sales and fan chart forecast of biscuits (cookies and crackers) at current prices, 2011-21
                      • Figure 11: Retail Canadian volume sales and fan chart forecast of biscuits (cookies and crackers), 2011-21
                      • Figure 12: Retail Canadian sales and forecast of biscuits (cookies and crackers), at current prices, 2011-21
                  • Market Factors

                    • Focus on health and weight management to continue
                      • Figure 13: Body mass index, self-reported rate of being overweight or obese among Canadian adults, by gender, 2010-14
                    • Baking can address pressures time-pressed Canadians in different ways
                      • Differences among older and younger Canadians require accommodation
                        • Figure 14: Population aged 65 years and over in Canada, historical and projected (% of total), 1971-2061
                    • Key Players – What You Need to Know

                      • Baking remains a popular among Canadians
                        • Sugar represents challenges for sweet baked goods
                          • Sweet baked goods can blur category and flavour lines in innovation
                          • What’s Working?

                            • Baking remains a popular activity for Canadians
                              • Figure 15: Becel – Baking With Heart commercial, June 2016
                          • Challenges

                            • Sugar’s demonization creates challenges for sweet baked goods
                            • What to Look Out For?

                              • Sweet baked goods can blur category and flavour lines in innovation
                                • Figure 16: Dare Cookie Chips Chocolate Chips Cookies (Canada), August 2014
                                • Figure 17: PubCakes Cocoa Porter Craft Beer Cake Mix (US), July 2015
                                • Figure 18: President’s Choice Sweet and Spicy Chocolate Chip and Chili Cookie Thins (Canada), November 2016
                                • Figure 19: President’s Choice Soft-Baked Ginger Cookies (Canada), March 2017
                                • Figure 20: Balocco Grand Marnier Panettone (Canada), December 2016
                                • Figure 21: Kentucky Woods Bourbon Barrel Cake (US), July 2016
                                • Figure 22: Chiostro di Saronno Amaretto Flavored Panettone Cake (US), November 2016
                              • Sweet baked goods don’t need to be sweet ‘bad’ goods
                                • Figure 23: Simple Truth Organic Blueberry Breakfast Cookies (US), March 2017
                                • Figure 24: Natural Nectar Whole Oats & Honey Organic Breakfast Biscuits (US), March 2017
                                • Figure 25: Morning Sunshine Kitchen Pro2Bites Peanut Butter Berry Cookie Bites (US), December 2015
                                • Figure 26: MHP Fit & Lean Chocolate Fudge High Protein Brownie (US), October 2016
                                • Figure 27: Fiber One Chocolate Chip Cookie Brownies (US), March 2017
                                • Figure 28: HipSnacks Gluten Free Chocolate Hip Cookie (US), March 2017
                                • Figure 29: Cissé Trading Cherry & Sea Salt Brownie Thins (US), September 2016
                                • Figure 30: Emmy’s Organics Dark Cacao Organic Coconut Cookies (US), January 2017
                              • Compelling baking mixes can capitalize on baking’s popularity
                                • Figure 31: Scratch & Grain Baking Chocolate Chip All Natural Cookie Kit (US), October 2016
                                • Figure 32: Scratch & Grain Baking Chocolate Chip All Natural Cheesecake Brownie Kit (US), March 2016
                                • Figure 33: Kroger Chocolate Lava Cake Ready to Pour Batter (US), December 2016
                                • Figure 34: Donini S’mores Snack Mix (US), January 2017
                                • Figure 35: Batterlicious Cookie Dough Company Cinnamonly Toffee Cookie Dough, (US), January 2017
                                • Figure 36: Simply Sweet Ideas All Natural Sugar Cookie Dough (US), March 2017
                            • The Consumer – What You Need to Know

                              • Cookies rank as the most commonly eaten sweet baked good
                                • Two in five Canadians express “concern” over sugar in sweet baked goods
                                  • Canadians show interest in new, different and international flavours
                                    • Opportunity to support category growth with snacking across dayparts
                                      • Canadians express limited demand for gluten-free
                                      • Usage of Sweet Baked Goods

                                        • Cookies rank as the most commonly eaten sweet baked good
                                          • Figure 37: Sweet baked goods eaten in the past three months, February 2017
                                        • Younger and older consumers exhibit differences in what sweet baked goods they eat
                                          • Figure 38: Select sweet baked goods eaten in the past three months, 18-44s vs over-45s, February 2017
                                        • Where Canadians consider getting sweet baked goods underscores the importance of freshness
                                          • Figure 39: Where or how would Canadians consider getting baked goods, February 2017
                                          • Figure 40: Where or how would Canadians consider getting baked goods – Cookies, cakes and pies, February 2017
                                        • Younger consumers are more likely to consider foodservice in considering where they get sweet baked goods
                                          • Figure 41: Foodservice venues where Canadians get sweet baked goods, by age group, February 2017
                                      • Health and Sweet Baked Goods

                                        • ‘Better-for-you’ positioning can affirm sweet baked good consumption for young women
                                          • Figure 42: Statements related to sweet baked goods, February 2017
                                        • Two in five Canadians express “concern” over sugar in sweet baked goods
                                          • Figure 43: Concern around sugar in sweet baked goods, by gender and age, February 2017
                                          • Figure 44: Freeyumm Banana Maple Cookies (Canada), April 2016
                                        • Canadians express limited demand for gluten-free
                                          • Figure 45: Factors that influence sweet baked goods purchases, February 2017
                                        • Smaller portion sizes can help alleviate guilt
                                          • Figure 46: Interest in mini-sized indulgent baked goods, February 2017
                                          • Figure 47: Première Moisson Mini Dark Chocolate Croissants, March 2017 (Canada)
                                          • Figure 48: Sara Lee Double Chocolate Mini Brownies, June 2016 (Canada)
                                      • Flavour Innovation

                                        • Canadians show interest in new, different and international flavours
                                          • Figure 49: Interest in sweet baked goods, February 2017
                                          • Figure 50: Arz Fine Foods Mixed Nut Baklawa, November 2016 (Canada)
                                        • Opportunities for premium offerings apparent though co-branding initiatives
                                          • Figure 51: Interest in sweet sophisticated flavours among women, by age, February 2017
                                      • Connecting with Fresh

                                        • Sweet baked goods brands can benefit by promoting connections with consumers
                                          • Baking from scratch is way to further personal connections
                                            • Figure 52: Baking, by parental status, February 2017
                                        • Snacking and Sweet Baked Goods

                                          • Opportunity to support category growth with snacking across dayparts
                                            • Figure 53: Health-related sweet baked goods statements (% agree), women 18-24 vs Overall population, February 2017
                                          • Pairing opportunities a means to support incremental sales
                                            • Figure 54: Sweet baked goods are better when paired with the right beverage (% agree), by age, February 2017
                                        • Consumer Segments

                                          • Similarities in the US and Canada presents opportunity for scalability
                                            • Figure 55: US and Canadian retail volume consumption per capita – Sweet Bakery, 2010-15
                                        • Appendix – Data Sources and Abbreviations

                                          • Data sources
                                            • Sales data
                                              • Fan chart forecast
                                                • Consumer survey data
                                                  • Consumer qualitative research
                                                    • Abbreviations and terms
                                                      • Abbreviations

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