2020
0
China Healthy Eating in Lower Tier Cities Market Report 2020
2020-12-15T03:00:47+00:00
OX994716
3695
128766
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Report
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“Consumers across all city tiers agree on what factors contribute to a healthy lifestyle and diet but lower tier city consumers are not as proactive in their health management. These…

China Healthy Eating in Lower Tier Cities Market Report 2020

£ 3,695 (Excl.Tax)

Description

Providing the most comprehensive and up-to-date information and analysis of the China Healthy Eating in Lower Tier Cities market, including the behaviours, preferences and habits of the consumer.

Although consumers in lower-tiered cities have similar attitudes towards the importance of healthy lifestyles to those in Tier 1, they have different responses to the way that information is displayed. While Tier 1 consumers prefer more sophisticated and trendy concepts to convey health information, those in lower tiers are more responsive to simple and direct messaging.

With the pandemic bringing health and wellbeing more into public focus, healthy lifestyles have become more important to consumer choice. However, those in lower-tier cities tend to rely on self-diagnosis, while being less proactive about their holistic wellbeing. The popularity of wearable technology could be utilised to help encourage consumers to engage in healthy eating, as well as strong and simplified claims from brands.

This report covers the current insights into lower tier consumers’ engagement with healthy eating and lifestyles. With changes in the way citizens shop thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic, it also addresses the challenges and new opportunities for brands going forwards.

Read on to discover more details or take a look at all of our Health and Wellbeing Market Research.

Quickly understand

  • Attitudes towards health and healthy eating.
  • Purchase considerations in food and drinks.
  • Trust in authority during the purchasing journey.
  • Purchase channel preferences for food and drinks.

Covered in this report

Brands: Keep, Boohee (薄荷健康), Chocday, Jingdong Daojia (京东到家), JD Supermarket, Coca-Cola, Heinz, Biostime, Oz Cow, Kelloggs, Classy Kiss, Jian Chun, WeChat, Hormel, Wonderful Pistachios, Tlamee, Huiyuan, Huang Xiao Chu (黄小厨), Natural Food IH (五谷磨房), Chicecream (钟薛高).

Expert analysis from a specialist in the field

Written by Annie Jiang, a leading analyst in the Health sector, her extensive knowledge delivers in-depth commentary and analysis to highlight current trends and add expert context to the numbers.

Consumers across all city tiers agree on what factors contribute to a healthy lifestyle and diet but lower tier city consumers are not as proactive in their health management. These consumers are more concerned about having to compromise on taste and, therefore, may encounter barriers to healthy eating in terms of self-control. Brands can help nudge these consumers into healthier behaviours by adopting technology, simplifying claims, and leveraging their strong trust in personal brands.

Annie Jiang
Research Analyst, Food and Drink

Table of Contents

  1. Overview

    • What you need to know
    • Covered in this report
    • Report scope
    • Objective and research methodology
    • Quantitative research
      • Figure 1: The sample structure for each city is as follows:
    • Qualitative research
      • Figure 2: Interviewed cities in the qualitative research
      • Figure 3: Profiles of respondents to the qualitative research
  2. Executive Summary

    • Lower tier cities are less proactive in health management
      • Figure 4: Factors important to achieving a healthy lifestyle – select factors, by city tier, July 2019
    • Technology could be a way to nudge them into healthier behaviours
      • Figure 5: Attitudes towards health tech – “It’s necessary to arrange diet and exercise according to daily monitoring of physical conditions (eg the amount of exercise, sleep quality)”, by city tier, July 2020
    • Lower tier cities more concerned about compromising on taste in a healthy diet
    • Simple, direct messages and powerful visual clues are key
    • Personal branding rather than quality of information establishes credibility
      • Figure 6: Attitudes towards social commerce channels – select statements, by city tier, October 2018
      • Figure 7: Health information sources – select sources, April 2020
    • Aftersales service is an important reassurance when expanding channels to market
      • Figure 8: Grocery shopping channels – select grocery categories, select channels, by city tier, September 2019
    • What we think
  3. Introduction to Lower Tier Cities in China

    • Population and spending power
    • Spending by Tier 3 and lower cities increases and takes a larger share
      • Figure 9: City populations and sales, by city tier, end of 2018
    • Per capita disposable income and spending power grows
      • Figure 10: Per capita salary vs per capita retail sales, by city tier, 2018
    • Spending confidence since the COVID-19 outbreak
      • Figure 11: GDP sector compositions, by city tier, 2018
      • Figure 12: Changes in financial status, percentage of respondents claiming they are ‘better off’, by city tier, Apr-Jul 2020
      • Figure 13: Confidence in improving future finances, very confident/somewhat confident, by city tier, Apr-Jul 2020
    • Demographic profile/analysis
    • Gaps between city tiers narrowing in both economic and educational respects
      • Figure 14: Educational level of surveyed respondents, by city tier, 2017- June 2020
      • Figure 15: Car ownership and gym membership, by city tier, 2017- June 2020
  4. Impact of COVID-19 on Food and Drink Spending

    • Evident increase in in-home food spending across all tiers
      • Figure 16: Changes in spending – “Food (in home)”, “Spent more”, by city tier, February-November
    • Fresh fruit and meal solutions saw the biggest volume update
      • Figure 17: Changes to consumption of select food and drink categories after COVID-19 – “Bought more”, by city tier, Apr 26-May 2
    • Dairy products lead trading up
      • Figure 18: Changes in food and drink categories after COVID-19, % spent more, by city tier, May 27-Jun 3
      • Figure 19: Changes in consumption frequency of packaged bakery foods – select sub-categories, by city tier, January 2020
  5. The Consumer: Attitudes towards Health

    • Quantitative data suggests no difference in defining what is needed to achieve good health
      • Figure 20: Factors important to achieving a healthy lifestyle – by city tier, July 2019
    • However qualitative research reveals lower tier city consumers still spontaneously associate health with a lack of illness
    • Reconciling quantitative and qualitative findings
    • Barriers to achieving a healthy lifestyle differ
      • Figure 21: Factors important to achieving a healthy lifestyle – select factors with biggest difference, by city tier, July 2019
    • Strong interest in knowing more about health drives adoption of technologies
      • Figure 22: Attitudes towards health tech – “It’s necessary to arrange diet and exercise according to daily monitoring of physical conditions (eg the amount of exercise, sleep quality)”, by city tier, July 2020
    • What it means for brands
    • Creating a community to help consumers focus on holistic health
      • Figure 23: Keep forum “Showcase your nutritious breakfast”
    • Using wearable technology to identify health issues and provide management plans
      • Figure 24: Screenshots of different services provided by the Boohee app
  6. Attitudes towards Healthy Eating

    • Other than meat consumption, consumers show broadly similar understanding of a healthy diet
      • Figure 25: Features of a healthy diet, by city tier, August 2020
      • Figure 26: Features of a healthy diet – “Controlling consumption of meat”, by city tier, August 2020
    • Lower tier city consumers are more likely to associate a healthy diet with compromising on taste
      • Figure 27: Cooking methods used – “Meat (excluding seafood and freshwater food)”, by city tier, September 2020
    • Availability may be an issue restricting healthy eating
    • What it means for brands
    • Create minus-claims without compromising on taste
    • Use “healthy” ingredients to offset indulgent products
      • Figure 28: Infographic on Chocday quinoa dark chocolate
    • Leverage developments in new retail to increase availability
  7. Attractive product features

    • What difference does quantitative data suggest
    • Simple clues are more likely to appeal to residents of lower tier cities
      • Figure 29: Attractive features of a light meal – select features, by city tier, November 2018
      • Figure 30: Superior aspects of chilled drinks – select aspects, by city tier, December 2019
    • Premiumise with formal proof of sourcing
      • Figure 31: Interest in premium features of food and drink products, August 2020
      • Figure 32: Interest in premium features of food and drinks product – “Organic certification”, by city tier, August 2020
    • Why the difference as suggested by qualitative research
    • Provide clear labelling to help consumers interpret complicated nutritional data
    • Clean sourcing and freshness are key determinants of healthy ingredients
    • Using innovative ways to prove quality of product
    • What it means for brands
    • Simplified message and visual guidance are more persuasive
      • Figure 33: Kellogg’s cereal infographic
      • Figure 34: Classy Kiss Bifidobacterium C-I Flavored Yogurt, China, 2020
      • Figure 35: Yogurt product consumed by female, 29, Shanxi Xianyang
    • Transparent tracing systems can help brands prove their authenticity
      • Figure 36: Screenshot of infant milk formula traceability WeChat mini program
    • Offer visual clues to prove quality of product
      • Figure 37: Hormel beef jerky product description page
      • Figure 38: Wonderful Pistachios product packaging
  8. Trust in Authority

    • Generally higher trust than those in Tier 1 cities
      • Figure 39: Attitudes towards social commerce channels – select statements, by city tier, October 2018
      • Figure 40: Health information sources – select sources, by city tier, April 2020
    • Trust is dependent on the information source rather than the quality of information
    • Government-backed or public figures with positive images are strong reassurance
    • What it means for brands
    • Establish authoritative personal brand of the founder
      • Figure 41: Cai Lan Hua Hua Shi Jie infographic
      • Figure 42: Huang Xiao Chu official Tmall store cover photo
    • Team up with specialized authority figures to establish trust
      • Figure 43: Infographic highlighting Dingxiang Doctor collaboration
  9. Channel Preferences

    • Even though online penetration is high, offline still plays an important role in lower tier
      • Figure 44: Grocery shopping channels – select grocery categories, select channels, by city tier, September 2019
    • Choices limited by different levels of retail development
      • Figure 45: Premium food and drink purchase channels – select channels, by city tier, February 2019
    • Trust in quality and value-added services drive offline shopping
    • What it means for brands
    • Aftersales service guarantee is an important quality assurance
      • Figure 46: Consumer feedback on Chicecream apology package
  10. Appendix – Abbreviations

    • Abbreviations

About the report

This market report provides in-depth analysis and insight supported by a range of data. At the same time, introductory and top-level content is provided to give you an overview of the issues covered.

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