2021
9
UK Womenswear Market Report 2021
2021-05-28T04:20:57+01:00
OX1050285
2195
138929
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Report
en_GB
“The womenswear market has been hard hit by the COVID-19 outbreak, with women drastically cutting back on their clothes purchasing as a result of changes to their lifestyles. While there…

UK Womenswear Market Report 2021

£ 2,195 (Excl.Tax)

Description

Providing the most comprehensive and up-to-date information and analysis of the UK Womenswear market, including the behaviours, preferences and habits of the consumer.

The womenswear market was heavily hit by the COVID-19 pandemic, especially among the 16-24 demographic. Lockdowns limiting in-store shopping opportunities and income reductions have caused women to cut back, seeing a 13.5% decline in spending in 2020.

With lifestyle changes from the pandemic having changed and removed the main drivers for buying new clothes, 43% of women agree that the price of clothes has become more important to them than before the outbreak. There has, however, been a trend in vintage fashion and thriftier shopping, with 3 in 10 women having purchased second hand garments in the last 12 months.

While there remains a pent-up demand for new clothes, but it may take several years before the market recovers to pre-pandemic levels. There remain opportunities in the AB market and among higher income households, who are more likely to have purchased new clothing in the last 12 months. Unique products and personalised shopping experiences are more attractive to this demographic, with launches in destination fashion concept stores.

Read on to discover more details or take a look at all of our UK Clothing, Footwear and Accessories market research.

Quickly understand

  • The impact of COVID-19 and the third national lockdown on the womenswear market.
  • What channels women use to shop for clothes for themselves and what types of retailers they buy from.
  • How women’s shopping behaviour has changed since COVID-19.
  • Changes in women’s priorities when buying clothes compared with 12 months ago.
  • Women’s views on inclusivity and diversity in fashion.
  • Womenswear market analysis.
  • Womenswear industry.

Covered in this report

Brands: Selfridges, Farfetch, Uniqlo, North Face, Gucci, H&M, IemIem, & Other Stories, Ganni, Homebase, Zara, Zalando, Amazon, Seasalt, Toast, Shop Direct Home Shopping, Newchic, Matalan, Sainsburys, Missguided, Freemans Grattan Holding, JD Williams & Co, Justfashionnow, Jack Willis, New Look, Sosandar, Canel, Tesco, Chrisian Dior Couture, I Saw It First London, Damart, Little Mistress, Nasty Gal, River Island Clothing, Floryday.com, Max Mara, Celine UK, Giorgio Armani, All Saints Clothing, Prada, Joules Clothing, Miu Miu, Yves St Laurent, Reiss Fashions, ASOS, In The Style, Marks & Spencer, Jaeger, Next, Simply Be, Primark, Very, Sosandar, Boohoo, Arket.

Expert analysis from a specialist in the field

This report, written by Tamara Sender Ceron, a leading analyst in the Clothing sector, delivers in-depth commentary and analysis to highlight current trends and add expert context to the numbers.

The womenswear market has been hard hit by the COVID-19 outbreak, with women drastically cutting back on their clothes purchasing as a result of changes to their lifestyles. While there has been some pent-up demand for buying new clothes released with the opening of stores in April 2021 and as further restrictions ease, consumer spending on womenswear has fallen to levels last seen in 2015 and it will take several years for it to fully recover to pre-pandemic levels. Retailers and brands will need to work even harder to differentiate their product offering and to provide a stand out shopping experience both in-store and online to encourage women to update their wardrobes, despite fewer purchase drivers such as workwear and holidays abroad.

Tamara Sender Ceron
Senior Fashion Analyst

Table of Contents

  1. Overview

    • Key issues covered in this Report
    • COVID-19: market context
    • Economic and other assumptions
    • Products covered in this Report
  2. Executive Summary

    • Impact of COVID-19 on womenswear
      • Figure 1: Short, medium and long-term impact of COVID-19 on womenswear, 2021
    • The market
    • Womenswear suffers from big declines in sales in 2020
      • Figure 2: Best and worst-case forecast for consumer spending on womenswear, 2015-25 (prepared on 26 April 2021)
    • Brexit leads to higher costs for womenswear brands
    • Young women very worried about future finances
    • Companies and brands
    • Retailers focus on in-store experiences
    • Ad spend on womenswear declines by 20% in 2020
    • The consumer
    • Surge in purchasing of casualwear, but also uplift in dresses
      • Figure 3: What fashion items women have bought in the last three months, March 2020 and April 2021
    • 85% purchased clothes online
      • Figure 4: How women bought clothing in the last 12 months, January 2021
    • Online-only retailers surge in popularity
      • Figure 5: Where women bought clothing for themselves in the last 12 months, January 2021
    • Tapping into the growing second-hand market
      • Figure 6: Clothes shopping behaviour in the last 12 months and future interest, January 2021
    • Fashion trends less important for Young Millennials
      • Figure 7: Changes in women’s priorities when buying clothes for themselves, January 2021
    • Women see inclusive brands as offering wide range of sizes
      • Figure 8: What makes a fashion brand/retailer inclusive, by generations, January 2021
    • Gen Z pay more for inclusive brands
      • Figure 9: Behaviours towards fashion brands in the last 12 months, January 2021
  3. Issues and Insights

    • Impact of COVID-19 on the womenswear market
    • What are the opportunities for growth in a challenging market?
    • Differentiating the in-store experience
    • Adapting to the growing importance of sustainability in fashion
    • Improving the online experience through new technology
    • Filling the gap in the market for stylish clothes aimed at older women
    • Ensuring that a brand is truly inclusive and diverse
  4. The Market – Key Takeaways

    • Womenswear hard hit by the pandemic
    • Brexit leads to higher costs for womenswear brands
    • Young women very worried about future finances
  5. Market Size and Forecast

    • COVID-19 hits womenswear sales hard
      • Figure 10: Short, medium and long-term impact of COVID-19 on womenswear, 2021
    • Womenswear declines by 13.5% in 2020
      • Figure 11: Best and worst-case forecast for consumer spending on menswear, 2015-25 (prepared on 26 April 2021)
      • Figure 12: Consumer spending on womenswear, 2015-25 (prepared on 26 April 2021)
    • Young women cut back the most
    • Failure of major retailers impacts the sector
    • Recovery will take time
    • Brexit leads to higher costs for womenswear brands
    • Market drivers and assumptions
      • Figure 13: Key drivers affecting Mintel’s market forecast, 2015-25 (prepared on 26 April 2021)
    • Learnings from the last recession
      • Figure 14: Consumer spending on womenswear, 2008-12
    • Forecast methodology
  6. Market Drivers

    • An ageing female population
      • Figure 15: Trends in the age structure of the UK female population, 2015-25
    • Rising levels of obesity
    • Womenswear hit by deep deflation
      • Figure 16: Consumer price inflation, March 2020-March 2021
    • Women less positive about their finances than men
      • Figure 17: “How would you generally describe your financial situation at the moment?”, by gender and age, March 2021
    • Young women very worried about future finances
      • Figure 18: “And how do you feel about your financial situation over the next year or so?”, by women and age, March 2021
    • Brexit viewed as having negative impact
      • Figure 19: Women’s economic outlook towards Brexit, March 2021
  7. Companies and Brands – Key Takeaways

    • Retailers focus on in-store experiences
    • New sustainability initiatives launched
    • Ad spend on womenswear declines by 20% in 2020
  8. Launch Activity and Innovation

    • Experiential stores
    • Selfridges adds new in-store experiences
      • Figure 20: Selfridges x SoulCycle, April 2021
    • Anya Hindmarch to open new five-store retail concept
    • Farfetch opens Browns store with connected mirrors
    • Uniqlo opens a store with an outdoor playground
    • Collaborations
    • North Face x Gucci
      • Figure 21: North Face x Gucci launches at Selfridges Corner Shop, January 2021
    • H&M and lemlem African collection
    • & Other Stories collaborates with designer Pyo
      • Figure 22: H&M and lemlem collaboration, April 2021
    • Ganni teams up with LFW designer
    • Extending into new categories
    • Next opens Homebase shop-in-shops
      • Figure 23: Homebase garden centre at Next Camberley, April 2021
    • PLT starts selling homeware
    • Zara launches pet clothing
      • Figure 24: Zara pet collection raincoat, March 2021
    • Online technology
    • Zalando and Amazon experiment with sizing technology
    • YNAP partners with AI specialists
    • Sustainability
    • H&M creates avatar of sustainability ambassador Maisie Williams
      • Figure 25: H&M partnership with Maisie Williams, April 2021
    • Seasalt gets Soil Association certificate for cotton
    • Selfridges expands pre-loved offer
      • Figure 26: Resellfridges pre-loved concept, November 2020
      • Figure 27: Selfridges’ Project Earth sustainability initiative, August 2020
    • Toast offers free repair service
      • Figure 28: Toast renewal repair service, April 2021
  9. Advertising and Marketing Activity

    • Ad spend declines by 20% in 2020
      • Figure 29: Total above-the-line, online display and direct mail advertising expenditure on women’s fashion, 2016-21 (Jan-Apr 2021)
    • Digital accounts for largest share of ad spend
      • Figure 30: Total above-the-line, online display and direct mail advertising expenditure on women’s fashion, by media type, 2020
    • Shop Direct highest spender on womenswear
      • Figure 31: Total above-the-line, online display and direct mail advertising expenditure on women’s fashion, by top advertisers, 2020
    • Key campaigns
    • Missguided partners with diversity charity
      • Figure 32: Missguided competition campaign with models of diversity, September 2020
    • I Saw It First collaborates with Love Island star
    • Nasty Gal partners with Gen Z wine brand
    • H&M launches AR campaign
      • Figure 33: H&M and Simone Rocha collaboration, March 2021
    • Nielsen Ad Intel coverage
  10. Brand Research

    • Brand map
      • Figure 34: Attitudes towards and usage of selected womenswear brands, June 2020-April 2021
    • Key brand metrics
      • Figure 35: Key metrics for selected brands, June 2020-April 2021
    • Brand attitudes: Joules seen as worth paying more for
      • Figure 36: Attitudes, by brand, June 2020-April 2021
    • Brand personality: Seasalt is viewed as the most ethical brand
      • Figure 37: Brand personality – Macro image, June 2020-April 2021
    • M&S associated with being reliable
      • Figure 38: Brand personality – Micro image, June 2020-April 2021
    • Brand analysis
    • Primark is the favourite womenswear brand
    • Seasalt is most diverse womenswear brand
    • ASOS stands out as most trusted pureplay fashion brand
  11. The Consumer – Key Takeaways

    • Uplift in dress purchases in Q1 2021
    • Tapping into the growing second-hand market
    • Women see inclusive brands as offering wide range of sizes
  12. Impact of COVID-19 on Womenswear

    • Half of women spend less on fashion since the COVID-19 pandemic
      • Figure 39: Changes to spending on clothing and accessories as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak, by age and gender, 16-22 April 2021
    • Store reopenings release pent-up demand…
      • Figure 40: Activities done in the last week, 16-22 April 2021
    • …but women still shopping more online
      • Figure 41: Changes in shopping behaviour as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak, by gender and age, 16-22 April 2021
    • Appearance becomes less of a priority
      • Figure 42: Changes to priorities as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak, by gender and age, 19 February-1 March 2021
    • Lack of summer holidays will hit sales of holiday wear
    • Young women hardest hit financially by COVID-19
      • Figure 43: Changes in household employment and financial situation since the start of the outbreak, 4-12 March 2021
  13. What They Buy

    • Big declines in purchasing of clothes and footwear
      • Figure 44: What fashion items women have bought in the last three months, March 2020 and April 2021
    • Surge in purchasing of sportswear and casual items
      • Figure 45: What clothing items have been bought in the last three months, March 2020 and April 2021
    • Uplift in dress purchases in April 2021
      • Figure 46: Purchasing of dresses in the last three months, December 2019-April 2021
    • Women buy fewer items
      • Figure 47: Number of clothing items bought on last shopping trip, by gender, Aril 2021
    • Women spend less than men per shopping trip
      • Figure 48: Amount spent on clothing items on last shopping trip, by gender, April 2021
  14. How They Shop

    • 85% purchased clothes online
      • Figure 49: How women bought clothing in the last 12 months, January 2021
    • Rise in purchasing via a smartphone
      • Figure 50: How women bought clothing in the last 12 months, December 2019 and January 2021
    • Gen Z use smartphones
      • Figure 51: How women bought clothing in the last 12 months, by age, January 2021
    • Gen Z shop across different channels
      • Figure 52: Repertoire of how women bought clothing in the last 12 months, January 2021
  15. Where They Shop

    • Online-only retailers surge in popularity
      • Figure 53: Where women bought clothing for themselves in the last 12 months, January 2021
    • Supermarkets and sports stores also benefited
      • Figure 54: Where women bought clothing for themselves in the last 12 months, December 2019 and January 2021
    • Pureplays draw young women
      • Figure 55: Women who bought clothing in the last 12 months from online-only retailers, supermarkets, department stores and/or sports stores, by age, January 2021
    • Mid-market retailers decline in popularity
      • Figure 56: Women who bought clothing in the last 12 months from value retailers, mid-market high street fashion stores, higher-priced high street fashion stores, independents and/or luxury retailers, by age, January 2021
    • Targeting brand loyal older women
      • Figure 57: Repertoire of types of retailers where women have bought clothing in the last 12 months, January 2021
  16. Changes in Shopping Behaviour

    • Tapping into the growing second-hand market
      • Figure 58: Clothes shopping behaviour in the last 12 months and future interest, January 2021
    • Gen X interested in online sizing and visual search functions
    • Targeting women aged 55+ with collaborations
  17. Changes in Priorities when Buying Clothes

    • Free online delivery rises up list of priorities
      • Figure 59: Changes in women’s priorities when buying clothes for themselves, January 2021
    • Women place growing importance on sustainable brands
      • Figure 60: Changes in women’s priorities when buying clothes for themselves, by age group, January 2021
    • Fashion trends less important for Young Millennials
      • Figure 61: Changes in women’s priorities related to fashion trends when buying clothes for themselves, by generations, January 2021
  18. Women’s Views on Inclusivity and Diversity in Fashion

    • Women see inclusive brands as offering wide range of sizes
      • Figure 62: What makes a fashion brand/retailer inclusive, January 2021
    • Growing demand for inclusive fashion brands to use diverse models
      • Figure 63: What makes a fashion brand/retailer inclusive, by generations, January 2021
    • Under-35s want to buy from charitable brands
    • Gen Z pay more for inclusive brands
      • Figure 64: Behaviours towards fashion brands in the last 12 months, January 2021
  19. Appendix – Data Sources, Abbreviations and Supporting Information

    • Abbreviations
    • Consumer research methodology
  20. Appendix – Market Size and Forecast

    • Forecast methodology
      • Figure 65: Best- and worst-case forecast of consumer spending on womenswear, 2020-25

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