Description

This report provides comprehensive and current information and analysis of the diversity, equity and inclusion market including diversity, equity and inclusion market size, anticipated market forecast, relevant market segmentation, and industry trends for diversity, equity and inclusion in the US.

Current market landscape

Following the nationwide attention placed on social justice and systemic racism in 2020, many brands and companies across industries were pressured to consider the ways in which implicit bias and cultural discrimination were at play in their own businesses. Quickly DEI initiatives and pledges have become table stakes as consumers, employers, investors and shareholders increasingly expect accountability, transparency and proof of progress from brands. This Report examines consumers’ perceptions of current DEI efforts in the workplace, in media content and in brand marketing to pinpoint what aspects of these initiatives are working and where they are falling short.

Market share and key industry trends

  • The majority of employed consumers (59%) have observed efforts to improve diversity, equity and inclusion at their place of work; however, four in 10 employees say their employers’ commitment to DEI has faded in the past year, and 46% feel DEI initiatives are a fad that will eventually fade out completely. Employees who identify with a minority population are even more likely to share in these doubts.
  • More than a third of consumers say they will forgo brands that perpetuate cultural stereotypes in their advertising, and around six in 10 consumers feel brands need to better serve consumers with disabilities.
  • Nearly three in 10 people feel seniors, people with disabilities and women are currently overlooked in workplace DEI initiatives. Over half of LGBTQ+ workers and more than six in 10 people with disabilities say they’ve felt out of place or pressure to assimilate at work due to aspects of their identity.

Future market trends in diversity, equity and inclusion

America is becoming more diverse with each new generation, and diverse audiences are more likely to expect authentic representation and inclusion across the workplace, entertainment, and branding. Among consumers aged 18- 34, 46% identify as BIPOC compared to about 42% of people aged 35-54 and less than three in 10 of adults aged 55 or older. In addition to racial and ethnic diversity, the country’s LGBTQ+ population is also growing. The latest polling data estimates that a record 7.1% of the US population identifies as LGBTQ+, which is more than double the estimated count from 2012 (“‘You are seen: A record 7.1% of US adults now identify as LGBTQ, new poll shows.” USA Today, February 17, 2022).

Read on to discover more about the diversity, equity and inclusion consumer market, read our Multicultural Young Adults & Social Media – US – 2022, or take a look at our other US Market research reports.

Quickly understand diversity, equity and inclusion in marketing

  • Employed consumers’ exposure to workplace DEI initiatives and their outlook on the impact, efficacy and gaps of these current efforts.
  • Consumers’ attitudes toward diverse representation and inclusion in media content and perceived opportunities for improvement.
  • Consumers’ outlook on and expectations of authentic representation and inclusivity in brand marketing.

Covered in this diversity, equity and inclusion market report

Brands include: Laura Geller Beauty, Gucci Beauty, L’Oréal, Open Source Afro Hair Library, Peloton.

Expert analysis from a specialist in diversity, equity and inclusion in the workplace

This report, written by Lisa Dubina, a leading analyst in the Culture and Identity sector, delivers in-depth commentary and analysis on diversity, equity and inclusion market research to highlight current trends and add expert context to the numbers.

In the past year, more brands and companies have turned their attentions to improving their diversity, equity and inclusion both internally and externally. Although consumers are noticing these efforts and seeing certain positive effects, the majority feel there is still a long way to go make workplaces, media and branding more authentically diverse and inclusive. To better meet consumers’ high expectations, brands need to set measurable goals for their DEI initiatives and leverage real voices and experiences to guide to their representation and inclusion efforts.
Lisa Dubina, Senior Analyst Culture and Identity
Lisa Dubina
Associate Director, Culture and Identity

Table of Contents

  1. Overview

    • What you need to know
    • This Report looks at the following areas
    • Definition
    • Market context
  2. Executive Summary

    • Top takeaways
    • Market overview
      • Figure 1: Population distribution, by age and race/Hispanic origin, 2022
      • Figure 2: Expectation for DEI and authentic representation, by race and Hispanic origin, by identify as person with a disability, by LGBTQ+ identity, 2022
    • Opportunities and challenges
    • Workplace DEI initiatives have made a positive impression, but many still question the long-term impact and permanence of these programs
      • Figure 3: Exposure to workplace DEI, 2022
      • Figure 4: Outlook on workplace DEI – Among employees who’ve experienced DEI initiatives, 2022
      • Figure 5: Attitudes toward workplace DEI, 2022
    • Diverse representation in media have improved, but still has a long way to go
      • Figure 6: Authentic media representation, 2022
      • Figure 7: Outlook on media representation, 2022
      • Figure 8: Critiques of diverse media representation, by ethnicity and Hispanic origin, by identify as person with a disability, by LGBTQ+ identity, 2022
    • Consumers are looking to brands to improve their DEI representation both internally and externally
      • Figure 9: Importance of brand DEI, by generation, 2022
      • Figure 10: Outlook on brand representation, by ethnicity and Hispanic origin, by identify as person with a disability, by LGBTQ+ identity, 2022
      • Figure 11: Outlook on brand accessibility and inclusion, by identify as person with a disability, 2022
  3. Target Audience – Diversity in America Today

    • America becomes more diverse with each generation
      • Figure 12: Population distribution, by age and race/Hispanic origin, 2022
    • Race and ethnicity is not the only aspect of the population that is diversifying
    • The importance for diversity, inclusion and equity across society
  4. Market Factors – The DEI Market

    • The rise of DEI initiatives and pledges
    • The calls for accountability and effective results
  5. The Consumer – Fast Facts

  6. DEI at Work – Exposure to DEI Initiatives

    • Nearly six in 10 employed Americans have experienced DEI initiatives at their workplace
      • Figure 13: Exposure to workplace DEI, 2022
    • Full-time, corporate employees are more likely to have experienced DEI initiatives at their workplace than part-time workers
      • Figure 14: Exposure to workplace DEI, by employment type, by household income, by generation, 2022
    • LGBTQ+ workers and those with a disability have observed DEI initiatives, but female workers have not
      • Figure 15: Exposure to workplace DEI, by gender, by LGBTQ+ identity, by identify as person with a disability, 2022
  7. DEI at Work – Experiences and Perceived Efficacy

    • The majority of employees who’ve experienced DEI efforts feel they have been impactful, yet many feel their employer’s commitment has faded
      • Figure 16: Outlook on workplace DEI – Among employees who’ve experienced DEI initiatives, 2022
      • Figure 17: Outlook on workplace DEI – Among employees who’ve experienced DEI initiatives, by gender, by LGBTQ+ identity, by identify as person with a disability, 2022
    • Many employees are still unsure about the long-term impact and longevity of workplace DEI initiatives
      • Figure 18: Attitudes toward workplace DEI, 2022
    • Those who’ve experienced DEI initiatives are more likely to question how fair and impactful DEI efforts are
      • Figure 19: Attitudes toward workplace DEI, by experience with DEI initiatives, 2022
    • Those who’ve experienced workplace DEI initiatives are more likely to prioritize DEI efforts in future employers
      • Figure 20: Importance of DEI efforts in future employment, by exposure to workplace DEI, 2022
    • Younger consumers and those who identify with a minority population are more likely to prioritize DEI efforts of future employers
      • Figure 21: Importance of DEI efforts in future employment – Among employees who’ve experienced DEI initiatives, by gender, by LGBTQ+ identity, by identify as person with a disability, 2022
      • Figure 22: Importance of DEI efforts in future employment – Among employees who’ve experienced DEI initiatives, by generation, 2022
  8. DEI at Work – Perceived Gaps in Inclusion and Representation

    • Nearly three in 10 people feel that senior citizens, people with disabilities and women are overlooked in workplace DEI efforts
      • Figure 23: Overlooked populations in DEI, 2022
    • Brand spotlight: senior insurance company, Saga, institutes grandparent-leave for its employees
      • Figure 24: Overlooked populations in DEI, by gender, by LGBTQ+ identity, by identify as person with a disability, 2022
    • As expected, populations perceived to be overlooked by DEI vary by race and ethnicity
      • Figure 25: Overlooked populations in DEI, by ethnicity and Hispanic origin, 2022
    • Over half of all employed Americans feel seen, heard and represented at work – yet gender and ethnicity heavily impact this
      • Figure 26: Positive work experiences, 2022
      • Figure 27: Positive work experiences, by gender, by race and Hispanic origin, 2022
    • Historically marginalized populations are more likely to have felt out of place or pressure to fit in at work
      • Figure 28: Negative work experiences, 2022
      • Figure 29: Negative work experiences, by identify as person with a disability, by LGBTQ+ identity, 2022
  9. DEI in Media – Experiences of Representation and Inclusion

    • Two thirds of consumers felt personally and authentically represented in media over the past year
      • Figure 30: Authentic media representation, 2022
    • As consumers get older they’re less likely to feel included and represented in media
      • Figure 31: Authentic media representation, by age, 2022
    • Consumers are most likely to have felt represented in movies, followed by streaming original series
      • Figure 32: Source of media representation, 2022
    • Brand spotlight: Disney’s Encanto captures the nuance of Colombian culture
      • Figure 33: This is why representation matters, January 2022
    • Women are more likely to feel represented in streaming shows and books, while men are more likely to feel represented in video games
      • Figure 34: Source of media representation, by gender, 2022
    • LGBTQ+ consumers and people who identify as disabled are more likely to report feeling represented compared to the total population
      • Figure 35: Source of media representation, by LGBTQ+ identity and by identify as person with a disability, 2022
      • Figure 36: Diversity behind the scenes of the 2022 Grammy’s, April 2022
    • Asian consumers are least likely to feel represented across nearly all media channels
      • Figure 37: Source of media representation, by ethnicity and Hispanic origin, 2022
    • People with disabilities and senior citizens are among the top populations perceived as overlooked in media
      • Figure 38: Overlooked populations in media, by LGBTQ+ identity, by identify with a disability, 2022
  10. DEI in the Media – Perceived Gaps in Representation and Inclusion

    • Diverse representation in media has improved, but still has a long way to go
      • Figure 39: Outlook on media representation, 2022
      • Figure 40: Outlook on media representation, by LGBTQ+ identify, by identify as person with a disability, 2022
    • It’s important that media companies leverage real voices and experiences when writing and portraying diverse characters
      • Figure 41: Critiques of diverse media representation, 2022
      • Figure 42: Critiques of diverse media representation, by ethnicity and Hispanic origin, by identify as person with a disability, by LGBTQ+ identity, 2022
    • Media spotlight: comparing South Asian representation in And just like that… versus Bridgerton
      • Figure 43: Investigating And Just Like That’s Diwali episode, January 2022
      • Figure 44: Moments of cultural representation in Bridgerton, April 2022
  11. DEI and Brands – Internal DEI and Authentic Representation

    • Younger generations prioritize brands’ internal DEI initiatives
      • Figure 45: Importance of brand DEI, by generation, 2022
    • Minority populations are also more attentive to brand DEI efforts
      • Figure 46: Importance of brand DEI, by ethnicity and Hispanic origin, by identify as person with a disability, by LGBTQ+ identity, 2022
    • Although consumers feel represented in marketing, it’s often not wholly authentic or relatable
      • Figure 47: Representation in advertising, by generation, 2022
      • Figure 48: Source of media representation, 2022
    • Millennial consumers are the most likely to have felt represented by advertising in the past year
      • Figure 49: Representation in advertising, by generation, 2022
    • Brand spotlight: Laura Geller Beauty embracing and celebrating age
      • Figure 50: Laura Geller Beauty invites women to “get older together”
    • Women and Asian consumers are less likely to feel represented in advertising
      • Figure 51: Representation in advertising, by gender, by ethnicity and Hispanic origin, 2022
  12. DEI and Brands – Consumer Expectations and Response

    • Over a third of consumers will forgo brands that perpetuate stereotypes
      • Figure 52: Outlook on brand representation, by generation, 2022
    • Black and LGBTQ+ consumers and those who identify with a disability are more likely to denounce stereotypical representation from brands
      • Figure 53: Outlook on brand representation, by ethnicity and Hispanic origin, by identify as person with a disability, by LGBTQ+ identity, 2022
    • About six in 10 people agree brands need to better serve consumers with disabilities
      • Figure 54: Outlook on brand accessibility and inclusion, by identify as person with a disability, 2022
      • Figure 55: Model Ellie Goldstein featured in Gucci Beauty campaign, June 2020
    • Brand spotlight: Nike continues to invest in accessible FlyEase technology
  13. Market Strategies and Future Opportunities

    • The intersection of Identity and other Mintel Trend Drivers
    • L’Oréal Paris’ “Lessons of Worth” demonstrates the intersection of Identity and Rights
      • Figure 56: The intersection of Identity and Rights
      • Figure 57: L’Oréal Paris’ “Lessons of Worth,” March 2022
    • Open Source Afro Hair Library bringing Identity to Technology
      • Figure 58: The intersection of Identity and Technology
      • Figure 59: Open Source Afro Hair Library is revolutionizing depictions of Black hair in video games, June 2021
    • Peloton appealing to consumers’ Identity and Wellbeing with adaptive training
      • Figure 60: The intersection of Identity and Wellbeing
      • Figure 61: Peloton introduces adaptive training consultant, Logan Aldridge, December 2021
    • Changi Airport supports the Identity and Experience of travelers with invisible disabilities
      • Figure 62: The intersection of Identity and Experience
  14. Appendix – Data Sources and Abbreviations

    • Data sources
    • Consumer survey data
    • Consumer qualitative research
    • Abbreviations and terms
    • Abbreviations
    • Terms

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